Last updated on: 10/9/2014 | Author: ProCon.org

Edwin Lyman, PhD Biography

Title:
Senior Scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) Global Security Program
Position:
Not Clearly Pro or Con to the question "Can Alternative Energy Effectively Replace Fossil Fuels?"
Reasoning:

“Roughly 86 percent of the energy Americans consumed in 2005 was generated from fossil fuels, which produce global warming emissions. Nuclear power supplied 8 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States, while hydroelectric power plants and other forms of renewable energy, including biomass, geothermal, wind, and solar, provided the remaining 6 percent…

Of the electricity used in the United States in 2005, fossil fuels generated 70 percent, nuclear power supplied roughly 21 percent, and hydroelectric dams and other renewable energy sources provided 9 percent…”

Cowritten with L. Gronlund and D. Lochbaum, “Nuclear Power in a Warming World: Assessing the Risks, Addressing the Challenges,” www.ucsusa.org, Dec. 2007

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
    Experts
Individuals with PhDs, or equivalent advanced degrees in fields relevant to alternative energy or fossil fuel issues. Also top-level government officials (such as foreign leaders, US presidents, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court Justices, members of legislative bodies, cabinet members, military leaders, etc.) with positions relevant to alternative energy or fossil fuel issues.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Senior Scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) Global Security Program, 2003-present
  • President, Nuclear Control Institute (NCI), 1995-2003
  • Expert panel member, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 2001
  • Member, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management
  • Member, US Department of Energy Nuclear Mateiral Stabilization Task Group, 1997-1998
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton University Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, 1992-1995
Education:
  • PhD, Theoretical Physics, Cornell University, 1992
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Is Nuclear Power Safe for Humans and the Environment?